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    WORK STUDY PAPERS TO GET SIGNED FOR SENIORS WITH WORK STUDY ON THEIR SCHEDULES. THESE MUST BE SIGNED AND RETURNED TO MR. YOST IN THE FIRST WEEK OF SCHOOL OTHERWISE THE STUDENT WILL BE PLACED IN STUDY HALL.
    KEEP IN MIND THE FOLLOWING DETAILS:
     
    1- IF YOU REQUEST WORK STUDY BUT A CLASS THAT YOU ALSO REQUESTED FALLS DURING 8TH OR 9TH PERIOD, YOU WILL GET THE CLASS. SCHEDULES WILL NOT BE ALTERED FOR ANY REASON!!
     
    2-IF YOU ARE FAILING A CLASS - ANY CLASS, YOU WILL LOSE WORK STUDY UNTIL YOU IMPROVE YOUR GRADES. IF YOU FAIL THE CLASS AT THE END OF THE 1ST SEMESTER, YOU WILL LOSE WORK STUDY UNTIL THE BEGINNING OF THE 3RD MARKING PERIOD.
     
    3- IF YOU DO NOT HAVE A JOB OR IF YOU LEAVE YOUR JOB YOU MUST OR CAN DROP WORK STUDY, ADD STUDY HALL, AND MAY DROP THE STUDY HALL LATER WHEN YOU GET ANOTHER JOB.
     
     
     
     
    Senior Guidance Counselor Information if anyone should need it for College or Job Applications:
     
    Mrs. Mary Beth Conville
    Title: Director of Guidance
    Address:  16th Street & Elk Avenue, Pottsville, PA 17901
    (570) 621 - 2964
    Fax number (570) 621-2037
    email: mbconville@pottsville.12.pa.us
    College Board CEEB CODE: 394100
     
    Please contact me if you add my name for a reference. I am glad to help and appreciate the notification.
     
     

    COLLEGE VISIT POLICY

    Students/parents should give the office and their teachers as much notice as possible. On the day of the visit, parent/guardian must call in to the main office stating the child went to a college visit. Upon returning from the college visit the student must bring 1- a note from the college they visited 2 - a note from parent/guardian. Students are limited to 3 visits per school year in grade 11 and 12 only.

     

    What to Do When Your First-Choice College Doesn't Work Out

    Posted  by Suzanne Shaffer

    The college admissions offers have all arrived but, sadly, your student’s dream school was a no. Or perhaps, the first-choice school came through, but the financial aid didn’t. It looks like it’s time to re-evaluate the colleges lower down on their application list.

    Of course, deciding to attend a college that wasn’t a top choice might initially seem like letdown. However, with the right mindset you can transform this disappointment into a higher education triumph.

    Reconsidering Second-choice Schools

    As you begin to reconsider your options, remind yourself of these five realities to keep positive and maximize your chances of finding the right collegiate match:

    1. Attending a college you can’t afford is a bad financial start.

    Students and parents have been known to take out huge student loans to pay for a college that didn’t offer financial aid. But entering college with debt sets a bad precedent. Taking out too many loans to finance a college education is a poor financial choice: Large amounts of student loan debt will mean your student has fewer choices in life upon graduation. Attending a school that offers more financial aid -- even if it was the second (or even third or fourth) choice -- can give your student more financial flexibility to follow their career dreams.

    2. You can now take a deeper look.

    Your student has the luxury of knowing they have been accepted. This fact gives them an opportunity to take a deeper look at the college. College choices are often made based on peer pressure, parent pressure and prestige. After all the hype and stress of applying have subsided it’s easier to sit down and look at the choices that were made in a more objective light. The pressure of applying is now gone and all you need to do is thoughtfully evaluate those colleges that have offered admission. A chance to make a calmer assessment might help your student discover a better fit.

    3. Another look could unearth a hidden gem.

    When preparing the college list, little time is spent investigating the lesser choices. Even though some colleges made the list, they are often considered less desirable. But now is the time to remember that those schools made the list for a reason. So take a closer look at those that have offered admission. Compare offers, visit their campuses again, talk to current students and be open to discovery. You never know what you might unearth in the process.

    4. These colleges want your student

    Why would you want to go to a college that doesn’t want you? There are colleges that actually want your student to attend—the college has offered them admission and maybe even wants them so badly that they offered generous financial aid awards that mean free money. Along with the aid, they might offer an honors program with perks. All these incentives are offered because they see your student as a valuable asset to their college community. Who doesn’t want to be wanted?

    5. Your student could fall in love.

    My daughter’s dream college offered her admission but did not offer any financial aid. No financial aid was a deal-breaker for us; she knew she would have to take a closer look at the colleges further down her list. To her surprise she fell in love with another college and never regretted not attending her dream college. Her experience isn’t uncommon. College students across the board say they ended up falling in love with their second and even third choice school.

    Of course, choosing a college can be an emotional process. When those rejections and disappointing financial aid awards first roll in, it can feel like all your future plans have been upended. But if you and your student just adjust your thinking a bit and put in a little more legwork, a satisfying college career is ahead.

     
     
     
     
    Image result for COMMON APP
    The 2020-2021 Common Application is now available. We're looking forward to a great year ahead! Check out the many ways you can get prepared to apply. 

    More than 800 colleges.

    Only one application. Information to be released soon.

    FAQS

     
    APPLYING FOR EARLY DECISION VS. EARLY ACTION

    The benefits and drawbacks of applying early

    Early decision (ED) and early action (EA) plans can be beneficial to students — but only to those who have thought through their college options carefully and have a clear preference for one institution.

    Early decision versus early action

    Early decision plans are binding — a student who is accepted as an ED applicant must attend the college. Early action plans are nonbinding — students receive an early response to their application but do not have to commit to the college until the normal reply date of May 1. Counselors need to make sure that students understand this key distinction between the two plans.

    Approximately 450 colleges have early decision or early action plans, and some have both. Some colleges offer a nonbinding option called single-choice early action, under which applicants may not apply ED or EA to any other college.

    ED plans have come under fire as unfair to students from families with low incomes, since they do not have the opportunity to compare financial aid offers. This may give an unfair advantage to applicants from families who have more financial resources.

    ED applicants

    • Apply early (usually in November) to first-choice college.
    • Receive an admission decision from the college well in advance of the usual notification date (usually by December).
    • Agree to attend the college if accepted and offered a financial aid package that is considered adequate by the family.
    • Apply to only one college early decision.
    • Apply to other colleges under regular admission plans.
    • Withdraw all other applications if accepted by ED.
    • Send a nonrefundable deposit well in advance of May 1.

    EA applicants

    • Apply early.
    • Receive an admission decision early in the admission cycle (usually in January or February).
    • Consider acceptance offer; do not have to commit upon receipt.
    • Apply to other colleges under regular admission plans.
    • Give the college a decision no later than the May 1 national response date.

    Who should apply early?

    Applying to an ED or EA plan is most appropriate for a student who:

    • Has researched colleges extensively.
    • Is absolutely sure that the college is the first choice.
    • Has found a college that is a strong match academically, socially and geographically.
    • Meets or exceeds the admission profile for the college for SAT® scores, GPA and class rank.
    • Has an academic record that has been consistently solid over time.

    Applying to an ED or EA plan is not appropriate for a student who:

    • Has not thoroughly researched colleges.
    • Is applying early just to avoid stress and paperwork.
    • Is not fully committed to attending the college.
    • Is applying early only because friends are.
    • Needs a strong senior fall semester to bring grades up.

    Encourage students who want to apply early to fill out NACAC's Early Decision Self-Evaluation Questionnaire, in the Deciding About Early Decision and Early Action handout. You may want to share this with parents as well.

    The benefits of applying early

    For a student who has a definite first-choice college, applying early has many benefits besides possibly increasing the chance of getting in. Applying early lets the student:

    • Reduce stress by cutting the time spent waiting for a decision.
    • Save the time and expense of submitting multiple applications.
    • Gain more time, once accepted, to look for housing and otherwise prepare for college.
    • Reassess options and apply elsewhere if not accepted.

    The drawbacks of applying early

    Pressure to decide: Committing to one college puts pressure on students to make serious decisions before they've explored all their options.

    Reduced financial aid opportunities: Students who apply under ED plans receive offers of admission and financial aid simultaneously and so will not be able to compare financial aid offers from other colleges. For students who absolutely need financial aid, applying early may be a risky option.

    Time crunch for other applications: Most colleges do not notify ED and EA applicants of admission until December 15. Because of the usual deadlines for applications, this means that if a student is rejected by the ED college, there are only two weeks left to send in other applications. Encourage those of your students who are applying early to prepare other applications as they wait to receive admission decisions from their first-choice college. 

    Senioritis: Applicants who learn early that they have been accepted into a college may feel that, their goal accomplished, they have no reason to work hard for the rest of the year. Early-applying students should know that colleges may rescind offers of admission should their senior-year grades drop.

    Students and parents can use our Pros and Cons of Applying to College Early, in the Deciding About Early Decision and Early Action handout, to weigh their options.

    Does applying early increase the chance of acceptance?

    Many students believe applying early means competing with fewer applicants and increasing their chances for acceptance. This is not always true. Colleges vary in the proportion of the class admitted early and in the percentage of early applicants they admit.

    Higher admission rates for ED applicants may correlate to stronger profiles among candidates choosing ED. Students should ask the admission office whether their institution's admission standards differ between ED and regular applicants, and then assess whether applying early makes sense given their own profile.

    The ethics of applying early decision

    The Common Application and some colleges' application forms require the student applying under early decision, as well as the parent and counselor, to sign an ED agreement form spelling out the plan's conditions.

    Make it clear in your school handbook and at college planning events that your policy for early-decision applications is to send the student's final transcript to one college only: anything else is unethical.

    Keep in mind

    • ED and EA program specifics vary, so students should get information as soon as possible directly from the admission staff at their first-choice college.
    • ED and EA applicants must take the October SAT or SAT Subject Tests™ in order for these scores to make it to the college in time.

    Print out and share the Early Decision and Early Action Calendar with students and parents to be sure they are aware of all the required steps for applying early.

     
     
     

    ANNOUNCING A PARTNERSHIP BETWEEN ROADTRIP NATION AND COLLEGE BOARD

    Start with your interests - your future will follow

    Choose your own way forward in college

    Explore careers and majors, find colleges, get high school course ideas, and try out what you like!

    Your interests are the guide.

    LET'S GO

     

    ROADMAP TO CAREERS  

    INTEREST ICONS GETS TONS OF CAREERS AND MAJORS THAT MATCH WHAT YOU LIKE

    FOLLOW THE CAREER JOURNEYS OF PEOPLE WHO INTEREST YOU Leaders

    Click the Link to see the Senior Timeline  that was enclosed with Senior schedules this summer. Senior Timeline 2017